Video Product

1973
The Way We Do Art Now and Other Sacred Tales

“A spoof on current art attitudes [that] stretches the definition of what can be considered art. Because the late 1960s and early 1970s were periods of innovation, using the human body as art, making process equivalent to product... [etc.], Baldessari questions that very sense of originality and exploration by taking it to its (rather mundane) limits. By taping a stick at one end, then picking it up at the other, he is both questioning and spoofing what constitutes art.” —Marcia Tucker, “John Baldessari: Pursuing the Unpredictable,” John Baldessari (New York: New Museum, 1981)

2017
Waypoint, Follow, Orbit, Focus, Track, Pan

Every country employs specific techniques for disguising its soldiers, every army has developed its own camouflage uniforms. Croatia is one of the few countries in the world that uses a digitized shape of its own territory in its camouflage military design. Why? The question is not meant to be answered by human reason. It does not relate to the perception of human eyes. Night vision cameras, binoculars, heat detectors and drones have their own ways of seeing the world.

2005
George Kuchar, The Wayward Syllabus

I wander around empty halls of academic buildings carrying bags of Halloween atrocities for our latest class project: a horror movie that lives up to that classification on multiple levels. The viewer is given a front row seat to the directorial process as young and nubile film students submit to attacks by rubber props in a Frankenstein thriller big on chills (caused mainly by the lack of budget) and low on underwear paraphernalia.

We
1990
We

In a visually difficult construction, Silver plays with the viewer’s ability to focus and take in an entire image. This puzzling tape is composed of three basic elements: a scrolling text, an image of street traffic that occupies one half of the split screen, and on the other side the image of a man masturbating, focusing on the hand and penis. The viewer’s attention is suspended between these two disparate images, unable to make sense of their correlation. This confusion demonstrates the meaning of the text that reads, “If we keep attaching meanings to everything we perceive ...

2009
We Began by Measuring Distance

Long still frames, text, language, and sound are weaved together to unfold the narrative of an anonymous group who fill their time by measuring distance. Innocent measurements transition into political ones, examining how image and sound communicate history. We Began by Measuring Distance explores an ultimate disenchantment with facts when the visual fails to communicate the tragic.

Produced by The Sharjah Biennial Production Programme.

1993
We Gather As a Family

This tape documents a cultural exchange between the Parakatêjê (Gavião) of Pará and their “relatives,” the Krahô of Tocantins. Kokrenum, the charismatic chief of the Parakatêjê, organizes a visit to the Krahô, who speak the same language and maintain their traditions. The 50 young Parakatêjê he brings along participate in a ceremony consisting of singing, body painting, and preparations for the long, strenuous relay race through the savannah. The following year, the Parakatêjê return the invitation and the Krahô travel to Kokrenum’s village.

1988
We Have the Force

We Have the Force opens with the letters of the alphabet appearing sequentially as the youths link each letter with activities surrounding drug use: A is for AIDS, B is for Body Bags, C is for Crack, etc. A story animated with paper dolls shows the way drug dealing is a fact of life in some neighborhoods, and too often the only employment available.

1988

We Have the Force opens with the letters of the alphabet appearing sequentially as the youths link each letter with activities surrounding drug use: A is for AIDS, B is for Body Bags, C is for Crack, etc. A story animated with paper dolls shows the way drug dealing is a fact of life in some neighborhoods, and too often the only employment available.

2017
George Barber "We Need to Speak Tony"

Five improvisers are asked to ‘channel’ the psyche of Tony Blair. George Barber asks questions, and also feeds the improvisers anecdotes from various sources about Tony Blair’s life and experience as the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. The work’s unifying themes are: Tony Blair landing in the Iraqi desert at night; meeting George Bush, and the regrets of his key decisions.

2019

We Were Hardly More Than Children tells an epic tale of an illegal abortion, as lived by two women on a perilous journey through a world that has little concern for their survival.

Paintings by Diane Messinger.

Music by Renato Umali.

Lena and friend: Flora Coker and Cecelia Condit.

2007
we will live to see these things, or, five pictures of what may come to pass

We will live to see these things... is a documentary video in five parts about competing visions of an uncertain future. Shot in 2005/06 in Damascus, Syria, the work combines fiction and non-fiction. Each section of the piece--the chronicle of a building in downtown Damascus, an interview with a dissident intellectual, documentation of an equestrian event, the fever dream of a U.S.

2017
Evan Meaney "+ + We Will Love You For Ever"

"This is an experimental virtual reality artwork, and while it offers opportunity for interaction, calling this a game goes too far. It is a disappointment simulator, a best-artist-ever-all-the-time artist simulator, a hospice simulator. The experience speaks to the art making process, impostor syndrome, decay, archives on the moon, and a persistent exile."

— Evan Meaney

*Please note ++ We Will Love You For Ever requires either HTC Vive or Oculus Rift to operate.

2006
we will win

The filmmaker and his friend, both Lebanese, meet two Israelis their own age in Paris, and spend some playful time with them. While they play a game, they refer constantly and humorously to the war and to the frozen status quo between the two countries.

This title is only available on Radical Closure.

1988
We, The Normal

On a back-to-nature trip to Boulder, Colorado, George goes to the mountains, but goes on the rocks emotionally.

This title is also available on The World of George Kuchar.

1983
The Weak Bullet

A bullet fired by two children travels on and randomly, intervening in a series of scenes in Oursler’s quirky, dismal puppet land. The bullet kills a suicidal man, re-aligns an antenna, strikes a prize stud bull, and ultimately impregnates a woman by passing through her neighbor’s left testicle, then lodging in her ovary. In this metaphor for the spread of violence in society, the bullet represents destructive forces of accidental death and the sexual forces that create new life.