African-American

2017
VDB TV: Decades

VDB TV: Decades is a unique series that casts a distinctive eye over the development of video as an art form from the early 1970s to the present, produced to mark the 40th anniversary of the Video Data Bank. Each program in this five-disc box set was curated by an inspiring artist, scholar, or media arts specialist focusing on a specific decade. Programmers surveyed the VDB collection to create personal, distinctive, and relevant programs, accompanied by original essays and texts, available as ROM content on each program disc.

1989
Viewpoints on Video: Envisioning the Black Aesthetic

This work was produced in connection with Icono Negro, a three-artist show at Long Beach Museum of Art exploring the dynamics and distinctions of black video art. Three works featured in the show—Tony Cokes’s Black Celebration, Philip Mallory Jones’s What Goes Around, and Lawrence Andrews’s An I for an I—are shown in their entireties and commented upon by curator Claire Aguilar and video artists Ulysses Jenkins and O. Funmilayo Makarah.

1991
Michele Wallace: An Interview

Michele Wallace's attention to the invisibility and/or fetishization of black women in the gallery and museum worlds has made possible new critical thinking around the intersection of race and gender in African American visual and popular culture, particularly in what she has called "the gap around the psychoanalytic" in contemporary African-American critical discourse. Wallace has taught creative writing at several universities, as well as Women’s Studies at the City College of New York.

2001
A Week in the Hole

A Week in the Hole chronicles a factory employee’s adjusting to the materials, time, space and personnel during his first day of work.

A Creative Capital 2001 Grantee.

Cast: Maurice Printis.

This title is only available on Broad Daylight and Other Times: Selected Works of Kevin Jerome Everson.

2016
Sapphire and the Slave Girl, 1995, Leah Gilliam

VDB TV: Decades
1990s: The Whole World is (Still) Watching

1990
Pat Ward Williams: An Interview

Pat Ward Williams’s socially charged works confront issues of race, often dealing specifically with African American history and identity. Using a variety of photographic processes, video, audio tapes, assemblage and text, Williams layers meanings and images. Her subjects range from the autobiographical to the public, often combining documentary techniques with personal responses. “When I make photos about my family, I think my family is not a lot different than other peoples’ families, so that is a way people can access my work...