Videoworks

2000
Anthony Discenza Videoworks: Volume 1

A compilation of Anthony Discenza's Videoworks, made from 1997 to 1999.

1998
Cecilia Dougherty Videoworks: Volume 1

A compilation of two videos that wittily explore counter-cultural identity through lesbian portrayals of iconic stars: in this case, the Beatles and British playwright Joe Orton.

1998
Cecilia Dougherty Videoworks: Volume 2

These three videos from Cecilia Dougherty deal with particular states of mind: that of a participant in a symbiotic relationship, the melancholy felt at the end of a romantic union, and the solitary non-space created by a regular commute.

2012
Barry Doupé Videoworks: Volume 1

Barry Doupé is known for using crude computer-animation indicative of early video games to create unnatural environments populated by strange abstracted characters. The spaces and the characters within them are never stable, always in a liminal state of being uncannily familiar yet completely foreign. For Doupé, these liminal spaces are meant to evoke the unsteady psychic terrain of the subconscious. This awareness of the subconscious as an unstable space of remembering is a major theme in all of the works in Barry Doupé Videoworks: Volume 1.

2003
Jim Finn Videoworks: Volume 1

Jim Finn's short works encompass a world of communism, dancing, karaoke and small animals.

2000
Paul Garrin Videoworks: Volume 1

Garrin advocates the use of video as an activist and community tool and a means for people to represent themselves. These three pieces examine the Tompkins Square riots, police harassment, and the use of home video equipment to record a truly democratic local news. 

“Once ‘Big Brother’ was the state watching the people, now the people can begin watching the state.”

—Paul Garrin

2001
Nelson Henricks Videoworks: Volume 1

"The videowork of Nelson Henricks, though quite varied in treatment and theme, has worked toward the articulation of a single concern: How can love fly through the air and be received by me?"

—Steve Reinke

2001
Nelson Henricks Videoworks: Volume 2

Three of these four works form a trilogy that explores one of the principle metaphors of video: the window. The window is used to examine notions of knowledge, voyeurism, surveillance and time. In addition, Crush is a reflection on identity, what it means to be human.

 

2005
Miranda July Videoworks: Volume 1

Four short videos by artist Miranda July, covering the period 1996 to 2001.

2016
Kent Lambert Videoworks: Volume 1

VDB is proud to present Kent Lambert Videoworks: Volume 1. Lambert is a Chicago-based musician and media artist. His creative output primarily consists of vocal driven art-pop music and pop-inflected video art made from repurposed industrial and commercial media. This comprehensive collection of his works reflect, critique and ultimately transcend American zeitgeists and Lambert's own consumption within them.

2001
Barbara Aronofsky Latham, Barbara Latham Videoworks: Volume 1

The five videos featured here investigate video as a tool for storytelling and the construction of alternate identities. Ultimately Latham concludes that video is an unsatisfactory and cumbersome tool useful only for the creation of dislocated narratives.

2012
Les LeVeque Videoworks: Volume 3

In Les LeVeque Videoworks: Volume 3, Les LeVeque explores time and the way in which it can be manipulated to affect the communication of emotion. In the first video, pulse pharma phantasm, LeVeque collapses 9 different pharmaceutical commercials into one another to the point that they cease to communicate relaxation or relief and instead create a visual cacophony whose erratic pulsations become almost hallucinatory. LeVeque’s point is to problematize the systematization of appeals to consumers through the use of tropes for the communication of comfort and tranquility.

2000
Les LeVeque Videoworks: Volume 1

Les LeVeque’s early works, featured on this compilation, demonstrate his fascination with slowing things down in order to see them better. Found footage, often of key historical moments, are digitally re-edited, slowed down, or encoded into ASCII to highlight underlying meanings and metaphors.